Education and the Public Interest on charters, segregation and the truth

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Segregation, Denver-style?

I listened to an interview on Colorado Public Radio of Ken Howe, director of the Education and the Public Interest Center at the University of Colorado at Boulder about charter schools assessment and their effectiveness. What was extremely interesting was his view on how charters are creating segregation. http://www.cpr.org/article/legacy-archive-2066#

Captivated I wanted to know more about this local organization. Use web link http://nepc.colorado.edu to reach the National Education Policy Center (NEPC) at the University of Colorado at Boulder School of Education. They sponsor research, produce policy briefs, and publish expert third party reviews of think tank reports. Denver Public Schools uses or has used a research think tank I believe in North Carolina. Anybody know how we can acquire the actual research reports DPS used to make decisions about charter schools in Montbello?

The following is from http://nepc.colorado.edu/think-tank-review-project

Think Tank Review Project
The Think Tank Review Project provides the public, policy makers, and the press with timely, academically sound reviews of selected think-tank publications. Reviewers for the Think Tank Review Project apply academic peer review standards to reports from think tanks and write brief reviews for the project web site. They are asked to examine the reports for the validity of assumptions, methodology, results, and strength of links between results and policy recommendations. The reviews, written in non-academic language, are intended to help policy makers, reporters, and others assess the merits of the reviewed reports. The Think Tank Review Project is made possible by funding from the Great Lakes Center for Education Research and Practice. To learn more about the Think Tank Review Project, you are invited to read the follow two commentaries published in Education Week.

Truthiness in Education: Why the Bunkum Awards Were Created
At a time when America’s education policymakers have nominally embraced the idea of tying school reform to “scientifically based research,” many of the nation’s most influential reports are little more than junk science. A hodgepodge of private “think tanks” at both the state and national levels wield significant and very often undeserved influence in policy discussions by cranking out an array of well-funded and slickly produced – yet ideologically driven – research. … See the full article by clicking onthe above link.

The Privatization Infatuation
In 2007, the second year of our Think Tank Review Project (thinktankreview.org), we reviewed 18 think-tank reports about education policy. Time after time, our reviewers identified analyses that led inexorably to a privatization prescription. Even reports that offered a reasonable analysis of the No Child Left Behind Act or the dropout problem suddenly and groundlessly identified as the key policy implication of their findings the need for vouchers or other forms of privatization. … See the full article by clicking onthe above link.

NON SEQUITUR (c) 2007 Wiley Miller. Dist. By UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.

NON SEQUITUR (c) 2007 Wiley Miller. Dist. By UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.

One thought on “Education and the Public Interest on charters, segregation and the truth

  1. Lusi

    In the South when racist could no longer openly kill and torture “unworthy” individuals, they hid under sheets to do their dirty work. These same racist are running our school districts, hiding behind paper sheets of authority. It is not physical intimidation this time. These clever marketing specialists plan to finish the job by taking the fundamental nature of teaching and learning away from people that need the most support. I grew up in the South and there was an ugly saying, “If you are white you’re alright, if you are brown you can stick around, if you are black GET OUT OF TOWN.” The need for students to apply for admission into charter schools pinpoints the same direction.

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